Projects

Thematic Projects: CHINA

a).The early evidence of limber holes used for the Chinese shipbuilding technology.

– Outlines:
Chinese shipbuilding technology has distinctively developed and demonstrates representative characteristics. Two documented shipwrecks that originated in China, the Quanzhou ship and Shinan shipwreck, adopted a basic construction method that utilised a keel with attached bulkhead structures. Bulkheads are regarded as one of the representative components of historic Chinese ships, and were used to produce watertight compartments and partitions, and further strengthen the hull. It should be noted that these bulkheads had limber holes along their bottom edges which allowed bilge water to flow on the bottom of ship. The limber holes associated with the bilge system must have been an important feature, yet their specific details have not been investigated or clarified. This thematic project will pursue the role and origin of limber holes on Asian ships based on a naval architectural review of documented Chinese ship remains.

– Researchers:
Xi, Longfei (Shipbuilding History Research Centre , WHUT)
Cai, Wei (Shipbuilding History Research Centre , WHUT)

b). The study of historic maritime infrastructure in the Asian regions

– Outlines:
Historical maritime cultural landscapes consist not only of archaeological ship remains but also maritime infrastructures. The remains of maritime infrastructures in the Asian region have not interpreted in relation to ship remains. Maritime infrastructures include ports, anchorages, shipyards, warehouses, ferry crossings, coastal forts, and derelict places. The significance of these sites is related to various themes associated with maritime trade and shipbuilding industries, and lead to a better understanding of local industries, social developments and warfare in the Asian region. This project will develop approaches to maritime infrastructure as an element in the interpretation of Asian ship remains. This study will provide information about archaeological remains of the Nanjing shipyard, as well as the Longjiang shipyard treatise, based on Chinese archival sources.

– Researchers:
Sally Church (Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge)

Thematic Projects: KOREA

a). Material analysis of the iron nails recovered from the plank of the Shinan Shipwreck

– Outline:
Based on an agreement with the National Research Institute of Marine Cultural Heritage, a wood sample containing possible iron nail remnants was recovered from a plank associated with the Shinan Shipwreck. The sample was sent to the Division for Archaeological Consultant at Kyusu Techno Research, Inc., and Masami Osawa to implement material analysis for the assessment of and assess the quality of the iron it contains.

– Researchers:
Lee Chul Han (National Research Institute of Marine Cultural Heritage)
Jun Kimura (Maritime Archaeology Program, Flinders University)
Masami Osawa (Kyusu Techno Research)

b). Project. A brief report of local coastal ships

– Outline:
Archaeological analyses of Korean shipbuilding technology indicate that the country’s local trading vessels were independently developed and adapted distinctive construction features from other Asian regions. Korea researchers have made inroads to trace the history and characteristics of these technological adaptations. The results, however, are only available in the Korean language. Consequently, a brief report of the most current information regarding traditional Korean shipbuilding technology will need to be produced and added to the website’s Shipwreck Database.

– Researchers:
Lee Chul Han (National Research Institute of Marine Cultural Heritage)
Randall Sasaki (Institute of Nautical Archaeology)

Thematic Projects: Japan

a). The analysis of the assemblage of wood recovered from Chinese ship remains in relation with shipyards.

– Outline:
Analysis of wood species from shipwrecks and ship remains provides clues to the interpretation of their origin. Wood species identification was implemented on ship remains from the Takashima Underwater Site, associated with the 13th century Yuan/Mongol invasion of Japan. Although historical texts demonstrate that the Yuan/Mongolian force was a combined fleet consisting of ships constructed in different regions of China and Korea, subsequent study of archaeological artefacts, including wood species identification, chemical analysis of a stone anchor stock, and analysis of brown glazed ceramic jars, indicates that most artefacts associated with the site originated from ships built in southern China. Shipbuilding traditions along the Chinese coast show diversities even within specific areas, and therefore more research addressing the origin of Chinese shipbuilding attributes needs to be conducted. This study will provide additional interpretation of identified wood species from the ship remains at the Takashima Underwater Site, as well as comparative analysis of the hull timber assemblage from the Shinan Shipwreck.

– Researchers:
Shuichi Noshiro (Forestry and Forest Product Research Institute)
Jun Kimura (Maritime Archaeology Program, Flinders University)